PLANT CARE

AIR PLANT

Genus: Tillandsia

Family: Bromeliaceae

MARIMO MOSS BALLS

Genus: Aegagropila

Family: Cladophoraceae

Lighting for Tillandsias should be bright but filtered (April - October). They should not be left in the direct sun in the summer months (this will cause the plant to become sunburned ). Tillandsias love direct sun (November - March). Tillandsias may be grown in the house directly in front of a window. Fresh moving air is advisable, but remember, the most important care need is bright filtered light.

 

As a main method of watering your plants, we recommend giving them a thorough rinsing under running water or letting them soak in a bath of water for 20-30 minutes. You can use a bowl, the sink or even the bathtub if you've got a family. After their shower or bath, gently shake the plants to remove any excess water from the base and the leaves, and set out to dry in an area with enough air circulation to dry them out in about 4 hours. If your plants need an in-between watering, misting them with a spray bottle is a great method. A plant in bloom should be rinsed rather than submerged in water, and take care when rinsing the delicate flowers.

 

Your plants should be watered once per week, and 2-3 times is recommended for optimal care. A longer, 2-hour soak is recommended every 2-3 weeks. If you are in a drier, hotter climate, more frequent watering or misting will be needed. You'll begin to notice that after watering, your plant's leaves will feel stiffer and full of water and they'll be softer and lighter in color when they're in need of water. Wrinkled or rolled leaves can be a sign of dehydration.

 

Tillandsias are tropical plants that usually live for several years and will bloom and produce flowers only one time during their lifetime. The flowers are striking and brilliantly colored, and the bloom period will last several days to many months, depending on the species. Different species bloom at different times, also depending on their care and environment. A plant will most likely go into bloom sometime between mid-winter and mid-summer.

 

 

Marimo, a Japanese word which literally translates to “seaweed ball” are not moss at all - they’re actually a rare form of spherical algae. There’s no central stone or kernel inside the sphere - it’s solid algae, radiating from the center, growing radially outward at the snail’s pace of just 5mm per year. But in their natural habitats - few fresh water lakes in Japan, Estonia, Iceland, Scotland and Australia - they’ve been known to grow to between 8 and 12 inches in diameter!

 

Keep your Marimo where they will receive low to medium indirect light. You must protect marimo from the direct rays of the sun, as Marimo can easily turn brown if they are getting direct light! Also keep in mind that direct sun will be intensified by glass marimo enclosures which can heat water quite quickly. Remember - these guys are native to cool lakes, and should be kept cool.

Marimo are well adapted to low light spaces and can photosynthesize in normal household light. If your space has no window, keep marimo close to a fluorescent or full-spectrum bulb.

 

Change water once every two weeks using regular tap water (for best results, allow water to sit out for 24 hours prior to changing the water). You’ll need to change the water more often in summer, as it will heat and evaporate more quickly. Clean your marimo enclosure with a brush if algae begins to grow on tank surface.

 

 

 

 

When succulents are indoors it’s often hard for them to get enough sunlight. Keep your plants as close to the window as you can, but be careful not to let them get sunburned if the light from the window gets too hot. This tends to happen most with south facing windows (which tend to get the most light if you’re in the northern hemisphere).

 

Give succulents enough water that the soil gets completely wet. Then, let it dry out completely before you water again - generally every 4-5 days. Don’t water it daily and don’t use a spray bottle.

Also know that succulents have a dormant period (most of them in the winter) and they don’t need as much water then. Since they are dormant, they aren’t growing and they don’t use up as much water.

Please note that succulents will naturally have some lower leaves that will shrivel and die. This is not a sign that your plant is unhealthy - it's natural for succulents to shed leaves in order for new growth to occur.

SUCCULENTS

Genus: Varied

Family: Varied

Hours:

SUN., MON.: 11:00 AM - 5:00 PM

TUES. & WED.: CLOSED

THURS thru SAT.:  11:00 AM - 6:00 PM

The Weathered Barn

41 Front St.

Greenport, NY 11944

Tel: 631.477.6811

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